Sunday, September 27, 2015

Photo of the Day

This is a photo of  my paternal grandmother and her younger sister.  It was probably taken in the early 1940s outside their home in Wilmington, Delaware.
Ellen Legates (1924 - 1970)
Kathlyene LeGates (1927 - 2008)


1 July 1947 Letter from the Quartermaster General

My maternal great-uncle was killed in action during World War II on 22 July 1944.  He was buried in an individual grave, uncasketed and in a poncho, in Guam No. 2 Cemetery, Plot C, Row 2, Grave 10.

During and after World War II the Graves Registration Service was responsible for the identification and proper burial of American servicemen who died overseas. Policies governing this work were set by The Quartermaster General. The service was responsible for the identification and burial of all Army, Navy, Marine, and Coast Guard personnel who lost their lives as the result of service outside the continental limits of the United States. The American Graves Registration Service took charge of the remains and cemeteries.

After World War II, the U.S. Graves Registration Service began contacting the families of those who died overseas, giving them the option of having their soldier buried in a U.S. cemetery overseas or brought home.  This is the letter my great-grandparents received from the Quartermaster General.



Below is the link to the Disposition of World War II Armed Forces Dead pamphlet that was included with the letter.

My great-grandparents chose to have my great-uncle's remains brought home to New Jersey to be buried in the Beverly National Cemetery.

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Request for Disposition of Remains

My maternal great-uncle was killed in action during World War II on 22 July 1944.  He was buried in an individual grave, uncasketed and in a poncho, in Guam No. 2 Cemetery, Plot C, Row 2, Grave 10.

During and after World War II the Graves Registration Service was responsible for the identification and proper burial of American servicemen who died overseas. Policies governing this work were set by The Quartermaster General. The service was responsible for the identification and burial of all Army, Navy, Marine, and Coast Guard personnel who lost their lives as the result of service outside the continental limits of the United States. The American Graves Registration Service took charge of the remains and cemeteries.

After World War II, the U.S. Graves Registration Service began contacting the families of those who died overseas, giving them the option of having their soldier buried in a U.S. cemetery overseas or brought home. My great-grandparents chose to have my great-uncle's remains brought home to New Jersey.

This is the Request for Disposition of Remains signed by my great-grandfather asking that my great-uncle be returned to the United States for final interment in the Beverly National Cemetery.






Sunday, September 20, 2015

Skeletal Chart

My maternal great-uncle was killed in action during World War II on 22 July 1944.  He was buried in an individual grave, uncasketed and in a poncho, in Guam No. 2 Cemetery, Plot C, Row 2, Grave 10.

During and after World War II the Graves Registration Service was responsible for the identification and proper burial of American servicemen who died overseas. Policies governing this work were set by The Quartermaster General. The service was responsible for the identification and burial of all Army, Navy, Marine, and Coast Guard personnel who lost their lives as the result of service outside the continental limits of the United States. The American Graves Registration Service took charge of the remains and cemeteries.

After World War II, the U.S. Graves Registration Service began contacting the families of those who died overseas, giving them the option of having their soldier buried in a U.S. cemetery overseas or brought home. My great-grandparents chose to have my great-uncle's remains brought home to New Jersey. A Disinterment Directive was completed on 15 October 1947 and the process to bring his remains home and laid to rest in the Beverly National Cemetery had begun.

This chart was used to document the condition of my great-uncle's bones once he was disinterred.



Thursday, September 10, 2015

Photo of the Day

This is a photo of my maternal grandmother taken in 1936.  She was 21 years old.

Kathryn Bunting
1915-1998

Monday, September 7, 2015

Identification Dental Chart

My maternal great-uncle died on 22 July 1944 in battle during World War II.  He was buried in an individual grave, uncasketed and in a poncho, in Guam No. 2 Cemetery, Plot C, Row 2, Grave 10.  He was disinterred on 28 November 1947.  These dental charts were used to identify his body.






Friday, September 4, 2015

Photo of the Day

This is a photo of my maternal grandmother.  It was taken in 1935 when she was 19 years old.

Kathryn Bunting
1915 - 1998

Thursday, September 3, 2015

The Authorized Inscription for a Government Headstone

But if he finds his . . . ancestor's name and position in full therein inscribed he will be satisfied that a grateful country had done due honor to the soldier whose sacrifice is one of the proud recollections of his family history.  — General Meigs, Memorandum, Quartermaster General's Office, February 8, 1873 

The basic information on a Government headstone application for World War II casualties included the name of the veteran, rank, company, regiment or vessel, date of death, the name and location of the cemetery, and the date of application.  The information was supplied by the Superintendent or Commanding Officer and the next of kin.  After receiving a completed application, the quartermaster clerks would verify the information on the applications.  Pencil marks are often found where clerks made clarifications regarding details of service.

A Government-issued headstone included the State from which the veteran came, a religious emblem in a small circle above the inscription on the face of the headstone; and the dates of birth and death.

This application was for my maternal great-uncle who was killed in battle on 22 July 1944.  The application was filed in 1948 because that is when his body was shipped home for burial at my great-grandparents' request.





March 16, 1904 Receipt

This receipt is from the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather and is for some paper hanging that my third great-gra...