Thursday, October 22, 2015

Photo of the Day

This is a photo of my maternal grandmother taken in 1937 next to her home in Trenton, New Jersey.  She was 22 years old.

Kathryn Bunting
1915-1998

Sunday, October 18, 2015

2 December 1946 Letter

My great-uncle was killed in action during World War II on 22 July 1944.  He was buried in an individual grave, uncasketed and in a poncho, in Guam No. 2 Cemetery, Plot C, Row 2, Grave 10.

During and after World War II the Graves Registration Service was responsible for the identification and proper burial of American servicemen who died overseas. Policies governing this work were set by The Quartermaster General. The service was responsible for the identification and burial of all Army, Navy, Marine, and Coast Guard personnel who lost their lives as the result of service outside the continental United States. The American Graves Registration Service took charge of the remains and cemeteries.

After World War II, the U.S. Graves Registration Service began contacting the families of those who died overseas, giving them the option of having their soldier buried in a U.S. cemetery overseas or brought home.

This is a letter my great-grandparents sent to the Quartermaster General's office. asking their options in regards to having my great-uncle buried in a Federal cemetery or in their family lot.  Again, I noticed that my great-grandmother's name is spelled with and E at the end.  I am thinking that this is a typo and that is why my great-grandmother only used her first initial.





Saturday, October 17, 2015

Photo of the Day

This is a photo of my aunt taken on 18 April 1965, Easter.  She is standing and holding a bible outside of her home next to all of the spring flowers in New Castle, Delaware.  She was 14 years old.

Diane Odgers
(1951 - 2002)

Friday, October 16, 2015

13 December 1946 Letter

My great-uncle was killed in action during World War II on 22 July 1944.  He was buried in an individual grave, uncasketed and in a poncho, in Guam No. 2 Cemetery, Plot C, Row 2, Grave 10.

During and after World War II the Graves Registration Service was responsible for the identification and proper burial of American servicemen who died overseas. Policies governing this work were set by The Quartermaster General. The service was responsible for the identification and burial of all Army, Navy, Marine, and Coast Guard personnel who lost their lives as the result of service outside the continental United States. The American Graves Registration Service took charge of the remains and cemeteries.

After World War II, the U.S. Graves Registration Service began contacting the families of those who died overseas, giving them the option of having their soldier buried in a U.S. cemetery overseas or brought home.

This is a letter from the Quartermaster General's Office to my great-grandparents asking them for their wishes in regards to my great-uncle's remains.



Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Photo of the Day

This is a photo of my great-aunt and my maternal grandmother, sisters.  It was probably taken in the late 1970s.

Laura Bunting Otarzewski Szul (1921-1994)
Kathryn Bunting Branyan (1915-1998)

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

30 January 1947 Letter

My great-uncle was killed in action during World War II on 22 July 1944.  He was buried in an individual grave, uncasketed and in a poncho, in Guam No. 2 Cemetery, Plot C, Row 2, Grave 10.

During and after World War II the Graves Registration Service was responsible for the identification and proper burial of American servicemen who died overseas. Policies governing this work were set by The Quartermaster General. The service was responsible for the identification and burial of all Army, Navy, Marine, and Coast Guard personnel who lost their lives as the result of service outside the continental United States. The American Graves Registration Service took charge of the remains and cemeteries.

After World War II, the U.S. Graves Registration Service began contacting the families of those who died overseas, giving them the option of having their soldier buried in a U.S. cemetery overseas or brought home.

This is a letter my great-grandparents sent to the Quartermaster General's office.  One thing I find interesting is that my great-grandmother signed an E at the end of her first name.  Was that a mistake or was it a typo and she HAD to sign her name that way?



Monday, October 12, 2015

Photo of the Day

This is a photo of my paternal grandfather taken in 1965 doing one of the things he loved most at a beach in Delaware.  He was 47 years old.

William Odgers, Sr.
1918-1986

Sunday, October 11, 2015

18 February 1947 Letter from the Memorial Division of the Quartermaster General

My great-uncle was killed in action during World War II on 22 July 1944.  He was buried in an individual grave, uncasketed and in a poncho, in Guam No. 2 Cemetery, Plot C, Row 2, Grave 10.

During and after World War II, the Graves Registration Service was responsible for the identification and proper burial of American servicemen who died overseas. Policies governing this work were set by The Quartermaster General. The service was responsible for the identification and burial of all Army, Navy, Marine, and Coast Guard personnel who lost their lives as the result of service outside the continental limits of the United States. The American Graves Registration Service took charge of the remains and cemeteries.

After World War II, the U.S. Graves Registration Service began contacting the families of those who died overseas, giving them the option of having their soldier buried in a U.S. cemetery overseas or brought home.  This is the letter my great-grandparents received from the Memorial Division of the Quartermaster General.



Thursday, October 8, 2015

Photo of the Day

This is a photo of my great-grandmother taken outside of her home in Trenton, New Jersey in 1943.  She would have been about 54 years old.

Margaret McCartan Bunting
(1889 - 1956)

Sunday, October 4, 2015

29 April 1947 Letter from the Memorial Division

My great-uncle was killed in action during World War II on 22 July 1944.  He was buried in an individual grave, uncasketed and in a poncho, in Guam No. 2 Cemetery, Plot C, Row 2, Grave 10.

After World War II, the U.S. Graves Registration Service began contacting the families of those who died overseas, giving them the option of having their soldier buried in a U.S. cemetery overseas or brought home.  This is the letter my great-grandparents received from the chief of the Memorial Division.  A photo of the cemetery in Guam was enclosed with this letter.



My great-grandparents chose to have my great-uncle's remains brought home to New Jersey to be buried in the Beverly National Cemetery.


Friday, October 2, 2015

Photo of the Day

This is a photo of my great-aunt and her husband posing before they went out for New Year's Eve 1963.  This was taken in my grandparents' living room in New Castle, Delaware.  She was 42 and he was 41 years old.

Louise Odgers Ellis (1921-2008)
Robert Ellis (1922-2008)
  

Physician's Affidavit of March 30, 1893

This Physician's Affidavit is part of my 3rd great-grandfather's Civil War Pension File.  It was filed on March 30, 1893.  It was 28...