Monday, July 6, 2020

March 16, 1904 Receipt

This receipt is from the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather and is for some paper hanging that my third great-grandmother had done at 1532 South 8th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  The paper hanging business was owned by a  Joseph R. Stenglein, who worked out of 1509 South 13th Street.  The business hung plain and ornamental paper.

There were four pieces of wallpaper hung on the side walls, 3 pieces on the ceiling, and 1 1/4 pieces on the border of the kitchen.  There were five pieces each hung on the dining room and parlor ceilings.

The total for all of the paper hanging was $3.29.  That would be about $95 today.




Thursday, July 2, 2020

May 14, 1904 Receipt

This receipt is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  It is from May 14, 1904, a couple of weeks after his death.  It looks like my third great-grandmother had her kitchen sink spigot replaced at her home at 1416 South 15th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  The cost was $1.25, which would be about $36 today.  

The plumber that did the work was David J. Lowery, who worked out of an office at the Southeast corner of 15th and Wharton Streets.  This receipt even lists his home address, 1436 South 16th Street, right around the corner from my third great-grandmother's home.






Wednesday, July 1, 2020

April 13, 1904 Receipt

This handwritten receipt is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  It is for some yard work that was done by a John Jenner at 1445 South 16th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  The charge was for $3.50, which would be about $100 today, and the fee looks to be paid on April 13, 1904.


Tuesday, June 30, 2020

January 1904 Receipt

This receipt is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  He was charged $12, which would be about $345 today, for some heater work that was done at his home at 1416 South 15th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This work was done by H.J. Shannon, who worked out of 1710 and 1719 Federal Street.  It leaves me to wonder if one of those addresses was his home and the other his business.


Monday, June 29, 2020

December 1, 1903 Receipt

This receipt is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  He was billed $2.05, which would be about $59 today, for repairs to a tin roof at 813 Tasker Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Payment was made in full on January 4, 1904 to H.J. Shannon. who worked out of 1710 and 1719 Federal Street.  According to this receipt, all roofs repairs were guaranteed.


Tuesday, June 16, 2020

General Affidavit of July 14, 1904

This General Affidavit is found in the Civil War Pension File of my third great-grandfather.  He had earned a pension by serving in the Union Army in Company I of the 215 Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry Volunteers.  

This form was filed over two months after he had died as my third great-grandmother was trying to receive a Widow's Pension.  She was unable to provide a marriage certificate as proof of her marriage, so she needed to provide other evidence.

This evidence is provided by Margaret Stewart, a 69 year old acquaintance of my third great-grandparents.  She was a resident of Collingdale, Delaware County in Pennsylvania.

She testified that she knew my third great-grandmother for 50 years and my third great-grandfather for 51 years.  She also declared that neither one of them had been married before their marriage to each other and that they had cohabitated as husband and wife from December 1854 until his death.  She also said that my third great-grandmother had not remarried.



Monday, June 15, 2020

May 9, 1903 Receipt

This receipt is found in the Civil War Pension file of my third great-grandfather.  It is dated May 9, 1903 and is for some work that was done at a couple different addresses, neither of which was his home at 1416 South 15th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania .

On January 15 there is a $1.25 charge for thawing of pipes and repairing leaks in the cellar of 1445 South 16th Street.  On February 14 there was some clearing of a pipe done at his home at the cost of 50 cents.  The last charge was for $4.32 for work done on 1532 South 8th Street.  It was for repairing a fire plate and a front grate and for setting fire bricks.  The total on the account was $6.07, which would be about $175 today.

There were two payments made on the account - $1 on March 19 and $2 on May 7th.  This left a balance of $3.07.

This receipt leaves me really curious as to what my third great-grandfather's connection was to the other two addresses.  I guess I will have to dig a little deeper into this one.




Sunday, June 14, 2020

U.S. Pension Office September 15, 1904

This paper is from the Civil War Pension File of my third great-grandfather.  It is dated over four months after his death.  He had qualified for a Civil War Pension by serving in the Union Army in Company I of the 215 Pennsylvania Infantry for a short time at the end of the war.

Following his death, my third great-grandmother had to legally file to receive his pension.  Her attorney was W. V. Sickel, an attorney in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania who specialized in pensions.


Saturday, June 13, 2020

General Affidavit of July 18, 1904

This General Affidavit is found in the Civil War Pension File of my third great-grandfather.  It was filed over two months after his death as my third great-grandmother was trying to file for a Widow's Pension.  He had qualified for the pension because he had served as a Union Soldier in Company I of the 215 Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry of Volunteers for a short time at the end of the war.

To receive a Widow's Pension, she had to prove that she actually had been married.  As she was unable to provide a marriage certificate, she needed to provide other means of proof.  This General Affidavit from Thomas S. White tries to do that.

Mr. White was 87 years old and a resident of Ocean City, New Jersey.  He testified that he had known my third great-grandparents since they were youths.  He said that they had gotten married in December 1854 and it was the only marriage for either of them.





Friday, June 12, 2020

Deposition of Rowland C. Evans July 10, 1904

This deposition is found in the Civil War Pension File of my third great-grandfather.  He had qualified for a pension by serving in the Union Army for a short time at the end of the Civil War.  This deposition was taken over two months after his death, when my third great-grandmother was filing to get a Widow's Pension.

She had hired an attorney, Rowland C. Evans, to search public and church records for proof of her marriage.  He had an office at 14 South Broad Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

He first requested the marriage record from the Registration Bureau for Births and Marriages of the Bureau of Heath.  He was informed that the bureau began in 1862.  That was no help since my third great-grandparents had been married in 1854.

He then reached out to Jacob J. Hatcher, the clerk of the North Tenth Street Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia.  This church was the successor of the Penn Presbyterian Church, where my third great-grandparents had been married.  According to Mr. Hatcher, the church kept no record of marriages.  Another dead end.

Mr. Evans testified that he believed that my third great-grandparents were married on December 31, 1854  by the pastor of the Penn Presbyterian Church, Francis D. Ladd.  Unfortunately, the pastor could not verify this since he had died on July 7, 1862.

After a careful search, Mr. Evans was unable to find any record of marriage, nor could he find anyone who was present at the time of the marriage ceremony.



Thursday, June 11, 2020

Deposition of Robert E. Henderson July 7, 1904

This deposition is found in the Civil War Pension File of my third great-grandfather.  It was taken over two months after his death when my third great-grandmother was trying to receive a Widow's Pension.  My third great-grandfather qualified for the pension by serving as a Union Soldier for a short time at the end of the Civil War.

My third great-grandmother was unable to provide a marriage certificate, so she had to provide other proof that she had a valid marriage and was qualified to receive the pension as a widow of a Union Soldier.

Robert E. Henderson of 1428 South Broad Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was an acquaintance of my third great-grandparents.  He stated he had lived with them from about 1866 to 1876.  When I looked at the 1870 census, there was no mention of him living with them, so maybe his timing is a little off.

He testified that as far as he knew, they were married on December 31, 1854 and had cohabited as husband and wife until December 31, 1903, when my third great-grandfather was committed to the State Hospital for the Insane at Norristown, Pennsylvania by order of the Court of Common Pleas for the County of Philadelphia.


Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Deposition of Thomas S. White June 21, 1904

This deposition is found in the Civil War Pension File of my third great-grandfather.  It was taken nearly two months after his death.  Without a marriage certificate, my third great-grandmother had to find other proof of their marriage so that she could continue to receive his pension.  A pension he had earned by serving in the Union Army for a short time at the end of the war.

Thomas S. White was 87 years old and lived at 14th and Pine Streets in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  He testified that he knew my third great-grandparents and other people in their neighborhood that knew the couple.  It was his knowledge that the two were married on or about December 31, 1854 and it was the only marriage for both of them.


Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Deposition of Margaret Stewart June 21, 1904

This deposition is found in the Civil War Pension File of my third great-grandfather.  He had earned the pension by serving as a Union soldier for a short time at the end of the war.  After his death, my third great-grandmother had to legally file to continue getting his pension.

Since she was unable to provide a marriage certificate, she had to find other ways of proving her marriage.  This deposition from Margaret Stewart was an attempt at doing just that.

Ms. Stewart was 70 years old and lived at Andrews and Clifton Avenues in Collingdale, Pennsylvania.  She was an acquaintance of my third great-grandparents and testified that she believed that they had been married on December 31, 1854 and it was the only marriage for the both of them.


Monday, June 8, 2020

Department of the Interior May 4, 1898

This document is from the Civil War Pension file of my third great-grandfather.  It has an amazing amount of family tree information on it.

My third great-grandparents were married on December 31, 1854 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  It was the first marriage for both of them.

I would be happy with that information, but the names and dates of birth are also listed for all of their children.  Now that's like winning the family historian jackpot!


Thursday, June 4, 2020

Widow's Pension of September 13, 1909

These Widow's Pension forms are from the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  It was filed by my third great-grandmother over five years after his death.  Both forms contain the same information, but one has a crossed out note on it.  Maybe that is why they rewrote the form.

At the time of this filing, she was living at 1201 East Chelton Avenue in the Germantown section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  This address is different than the one she shared with my third great-grandfather.  I believe she went to live with one of her daughters after the death of her husband.

My third great-grandfather qualified for a Civil War Pension because he served in the Union Army for a short time at the end of the war.  He enlisted, at age 33, as a private in Company I of the 215 Regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry on April 8, 1865 and was honorably discharged on July 31, 1865.

He first applied for his pension on September 2, 1890.  At the time of his death in 1904, he was receiving $12 a month.  My third great-grandmother had to file papers to continue getting the pension as his widow.

My third great-grandparents were married on December 31, 1854, the only marriage for both, and had been married for over 51 years at the time of my third great-grandfather's death.

The recognized attorney on this form is a W.V. Sickel, the same attorney that represented my third great-grandfather in many of his Civil War Pension legal filings.





Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Declaration for Widow's Pension on April 24, 1908

This Declaration for Widow's Pension is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  It was filed on April 24, 1908 by my third great-grandmother in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  At the time of the filing, she was 74 years old and living at 1201 East Chelton Avenue in the Germantown section of Philadelphia.

In the years prior to his death, my third great-grandfather was receiving a Civil War Pension from the United States Government.  He qualified for the pension by serving in Company I in the 215 Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry Volunteers of the Union Army for a short time at the end of the Civil War.  He was honorably discharged on July 31, 1865.

After my third great-grandfather's death on April 30, 1904, my third great-grandmother had to file to continue to receive his pension.  The two had been married for over 51 years.

This form contains great information for family history research.  First, my third great-grandmother's maiden name, Alexander.  And second, a wedding date and place - December 31, 1854 in Philadelphia.  It even lists the name of the reverend who married them, Reverend Francis.

My third great-grandmother used the same lawyer that her husband used numerous times in the legal filings of his Civil War Pension, a W.V. Sickel of Philadelphia.

The address of 1416 South 15th Street has been crossed out.  That is the home that my third great-grandparents shared.  In its place is 1201 East Chelton Avenue.  At some point after her husband's death, she moved in with one of her daughters.

The two witnesses for this form are two of her daughters, Lovey M. Henderson and Anna L. Odgers.




Tuesday, June 2, 2020

Index Sheet #3

This index sheet is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  It contains one item - the declaration for a Widow's Pension by my third great-grandmother.  It was filed on April 25, 1908.

My third great-grandfather qualified for a Civil War Pension because he served in the Union Army in company I of the 215 Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry for a short time at the end of the war.


Monday, June 1, 2020

Certificate of Death

This Death Certificate is found in the Civil War Pension file of my paternal third great-grandfather.  He died on April 30, 1904 at the age of 77 in the State Hospital in Norristown, Pennsylvania, where he had been a patient since December 8, 1903.

His cause of death is listed as ill health and a hernia.  He had been sick for more than five months.

It describes him as a married white male, but it does not list my third great-grandmother's name.  Both of his parents' names are also left blank.  His birth place is listed, Ireland, and it states that he was a machinist.  He was buried in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and the undertaker was an R. P. Morton.


Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Surgeon's Certificate of June 2, 1891

This Surgeon's Certificate is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  This examination was completed on June 2, 1891 and was part of his original pension claim.  He qualified for the pension by serving as a Union private for a short time at the end of the Civil War.  He had enlisted in Company I of the 215 Regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry.

At the time of this exam, he was 60 years old and living at 1416 South 15th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  He stood five feet eight and one quarter inches tall and weighed 198 pounds.

As part of his pension, my third great-grandfather was claiming that he incurred a rupture of his right side (hernia) and disease of his eyes during his service in the Union Army.  He stated, "I received a rupture while hauling powder during 1865 just previous to my discharge.  I caught cold in my eyes while at Alexandria during same year."

He appeared to be a healthy man at this exam.  It was noted that he had an inguinal hernia of his right side, which allowed a hen's egg sized tumor to protrude.  He had worn a truss for 25 years, which would have given the hernia support and relieved some of the discomfort.

His eyes were congested, with his left having conjunctivitis.  He wore glasses and was able to read relatively well with his right eye, but not his left.





Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Military Service

This War Department document, filed on May 22, 1891, is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  He enlisted as a private in Company I of the 215 Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry at the end of the Civil War on April 8, 1865.  He was discharged at Fort Delaware, a Union prison camp during the war, on July 31, 1865.


Saturday, May 2, 2020

Index Sheet #2

This is the second index sheet that I have found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  He qualified for a monthly pension from the United States Government because he served in Company I of the 215 Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry for a short time during the end of the Civil War.  My third great-grandmother is also listed on this form, as she qualified for his pension after his death.

The first date listed is May 16, 1893, when he first applied for the Pension.  It ends with a Certificate of Medical Examination on May 21, 1901.


Friday, May 1, 2020

Rejection Note

This short note is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  The number on the top is his file number.  The note states that his claim that he acquired his rupture (hernia) while he was serving in the Union Army at the end of the war has been rejected.  There was no record and no evidence provided that the injury occurred while he served as a Union soldier nor in the line of duty.

He also alleged that his varicose veins were incurred at the same time of his rupture, so this was also rejected.  He was approved for a cataract and rheumatism because this was not alleged to have occurred at the time he served in the Union Army.



Thursday, April 30, 2020

Invalid Pension - REJECTED

This form is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  It was originally submitted by his attorney, E.J. Lindsay, on March 27, 1902 and then again on March 30, 1910 by my widowed third great-grandmother.  They were both seeking an increase in the amount of his monthly pension.

He had qualified for the pension from the United States Government by serving as a private in Company I of the 215th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry at the end of the Civil War.  He enlisted on April 8, 1865 and was discharged on July 31, 1865.

My third great-grandfather claimed that while in the Union Army in July of 1865 at Fort Delaware, he incurred a rupture (hernia) and varicose veins and that he had suffered with that along with a cataract of the eye and rheumatism ever since his discharge.

At the time this form was originally filed, he lived at 1416 South 15th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  That address is crossed out and 3101 Madison Street was written.  This address is where my third great-grandmother was living at the time she filed for an increase in the monthly pension.

The pension increase was rejected because there was no medical record or other satisfactory evidence of existence of the hernia and varicose veins while he served in the Union Army nor at his discharge, and my third great-grandmother was also unable to establish the origin of these injuries.  The cataract and rheumatism were dismissed as they were not claimed at the time of military service.








Wednesday, April 29, 2020

Department of the Interior May 5, 1897

This form is found in the Civil War Pension file of my paternal third great-grandfather.  He had served at the end of the Civil War with Company I of the 215 Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry.  He enrolled on April 8, 1865 and was discharged on July 31, 1865.  During that time he served as a private and a sergeant.


Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Declaration For An Original Invalid Pension May 12, 1893

This form is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  It was filed on May 12, 1893 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by his attorney, Samuel J. Brown, who had an office at 911 Walnut Street in Philadelphia.  

At the end of the Civil War, my third great-grandfather enlisted in the Union Army in April 1865 and was commanded by a Colonel Rush in Company I of the 215th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry.  He was discharged from the army at Fort Delaware on August 15, 1865.

He stood five feet, eight inches tall.  He had a light complexion and brown hair and blue eyes.  He was 61 years old and was living at 1416 South 15th Street in Philadelphia.

He was claiming that in the line of duty while at Fort Delaware on or around July 20, 1865 that he was helping some other men with some powder.  The cart was going very fast in circles.  One of the shafts of the cart struck him and ruptured him.  He was discharged the following month and had suffered with cataract of the eye, rheumatism, and the rupture (hernia).  He was also claiming that he had contracted his varicose veins at the same time he suffered his rupture.

The time my third great-grandfather spent in the Union Army during the Civil War is the only time he spent in the military.  He was stating that he was now wholly disabled and unable to work as a machinist, his normal occupation.



Monday, April 27, 2020

Surgeon's Certificate of May 29, 1901: EXAMINATION--Continued

This form is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  He was seeking an increase in the monthly pension he qualified for by serving in Company I of the 215th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry at the at the end of the war.

The doctor doing this exam believed the cause of my third great-grandfather's impaired vision was due to a failed previous cataract surgery, as there was still some of the cataract remaining.  The doctor believed that eye strain caused by astigmatism would have been a cause of the cataracts.  He recommended that another operation might improve the cataract.

My third great-grandfather also complained of rheumatism in both of his shoulders.  His lower limbs were also stiff and his joints were limited in movement.  This is somewhat expected since he was 70 years old at the time of this exam.

He also had a double inguinal hernia and he wore a double truss.  On his right side, he had a pigeon's egg sized protrusion from the hernia and an even larger protrusion on his left side. Both could be clearly felt when my third great-grandfather coughed.  The truss that he wore would have pushed in the protrusions and helped ease some of the discomfort.

The surgeon noted that my third great-grandfather's face appeared flush, but he could find no evidence of alcoholism or other vicious habits.

My third great-grandfather was a patient at Wills Eye Hospital, under the care of a Surgeon Thompson, two years prior.  That is when he had his first cataract surgery.  He had another one a year prior to this exam.  Both procedures were done with an iridectomy, which would have removed part of his iris.



Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Surgeon's Certificate of May 29, 1901

This Surgeon's Certificate is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  He had qualified for a monthly pension from the United States Government by serving in Company I of the 215th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry at the end of the war.

At the time of his exam, May 29,1901, he was living at 1416 South 15th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  The exam took place at 1636 Walnut Street in the same city.  This would be a less than 10 minute car ride today.

My third great-grandfather's cause of disability was impaired vision due to cataracts, followed by operations, which were only partially successful.  These disabilities allowed him an $8 a month pension, about $250 today.

About five years prior to this exam, he noticed a deficit in his vision.  A year later he had to relinquish his work as a machinist on account of his cataracts.

My third great-grandfather, an Irish immigrant, was 70 years old at the time of this exam.  He stood five feet, eight and a half inches tall and weighed 160 pounds.  He had a ruddy complexion and had gray eyes and hair.  He was a married father of seven children, five of which were still living.

His external eye appearance seemed normal, but the oblique examination showed a dark membrane with few white streaks remaining after a cataract operation.  These findings called for another operation according to the examining doctor.





Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Department Of The Interior, Bureau Of Pensions May 25, 1901

This form from the Department of the Interior is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  It lists special instructions for the doctors who were examining him and who would give a recommendation as to  if his pension should be increased.  He qualified for a Civil War Pension by serving in Company I of the 215th Pennsylvania Infantry at the end of the war.

Special attention was to be given to the claim of impaired vision.  the Bureau of Pensions wanted to know the conditions of all his eye structures.  They also wanted the actual degree of impairment and cause of the impaired vision of each eye determined.

They were looking for cataracts or evidence of their surgical removal from my third great-grandfather's eyes.  They also wanted to know if his impaired vision was caused by "vicious habits."



Monday, April 20, 2020

Surgeon's Certificate of November 21, 1900

This Surgeon's Certificate is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  He was asking for an increase of his $8 monthly pension.  A pension that he earned while serving in Company I of the 215th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry at the end of the war.  Those $8 would be about $250 today.

This certificate was filed on November 21, 1900 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania .  At that time, my third great-grandfather was living at 1416 South 15th Street in the same city.

He was claiming that a hernia, impaired vision, rheumatism, varicose veins, senility, and blindness were the causes of his disability.  He was unable to do any manual labor and was being supported by his children.  He was a machinist by trade.

At the time of this examination, my third great-grandfather was 66 years old.  He stood five feet eight and a half inches tall and weighed 178 pounds. He was noted to be a healthy looking, well nourished muscular man, and despite him having been a machinist, he had soft palms.

He had a double complete inguinal hernia on his right side, which had caused a tumor the size of a black walnut.  The hernia was well supported by a truss.  This would have kept his protruding tissue (the tumor) in place and relieved some of his discomfort.

My third great-grandfather was blind in his left eye due to a cataract.  His right pupil was immobile.  He was able to discern light from darkness in that right eye, but that was all he could see.

He had a severe varicose vein in his right leg that ran from his upper thigh to his ankle.  He had a brownish discoloration around the lower third of his leg.  This was all marked on the included diagram.

As for his rheumatism, he had marked creaking in his shoulders and knees, which would cause him difficulty and pain.  Other than that, he had no other muscular or joint deformities.

At the end of this exam, the doctors recommended an increase of the pension to $12 a month, due to all of my third great-grandfather's disabilities, which left him unable to perform any manual labor.  That $12 would be about $370 today.



Wednesday, April 15, 2020

Surgeon's Certificate of November 28, 1898

This Surgeon's Certificate is from the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  He was trying to get an increase in the pension that he qualified for as he had served at the end of the Civil War as a private in Company I of the 215th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry.

At the time of this exam, November 28, 1898, he was 65 years old and living at 1416 South 15th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  He was receiving a monthly pension of $8, which would be about $250 today, for a right hernia, impaired vision, rheumatism, varicose veins, and senility.

I notice that my third great-grandfather's weight had gone up 38 pounds since he was examined on March 28, 1894 and he was considered well nourished at the time of this exam.

When his hernia was examined, a tumor was found.  It was the size of a hen's egg.  It was noted that the hernia could be supported by a truss.  This garment would have been worn under his clothing and would have kept any protruding tissue in place, thus helping with any discomfort.

Due to a cataract, my third great-grandfather was able to distinguish light, but unable to see any objects.



Tuesday, April 14, 2020

Surgeon's Certificate of March 28, 1894

This Surgeon's Certificate is from the Civil War Pension File of  my paternal third great-grandfather, who had served as a private at the end of the war in Company I of the 215th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry.  This was an application for a revision to his pension, and it is the first type-written from that I have come across in the file.

This examination took place on March 28, 1894.  At that time, my third great-grandfather was living at 1416 South 15th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  He was claiming that an incomplete right inguinal hernia, impaired vision, rheumatism and varicose veins were getting worse and he was unable to do manual labor.  A welder by trade, he was not working at that time and he was being supported by his sons.  He was receiving a Civil War Pension of $6 a month, which would be around $180 today.

At the time of this examination, my third great-grandfather was 62 years old.  He was five feet, eight and a half inches tall and weighed 178 pounds, which caused the examiners to say that he looked obese.  He was also noted to be "florid looking," which means he was flushed.  His hands showed some evidence of work.  These are some great details that help me put a picture to someone I have never seen.

He wore a truss for his inguinal hernia and was convinced it would protrude if he were to not wear it. An inguinal hernia occurs when tissue, like the intestine, protrudes through a weak point or a tear in the abdominal muscle.  This hernia could have been very painful.  The truss would have kept the protruding tissue in place and relieved some of the discomfort.

My third great-grandfather also wore a muslin stocking for his varicose veins.  This would have compressed the veins and helped them to perform properly.

He had a slight creaking in his left shoulder joint, but no evidence of rheumatism in any other muscle, joint, or tendon.

One good thing he had going for him was his heart, or so it seemed at the time of this exam.  He was noted to have a heart rate of 84 while standing and 98 after doing some sort of exercise.

He wore glasses and was totally blind in his his left eye due to a cataract.  It was noted that he had another cataract forming in his right eye.

There were no other disabilities found and he had no disabilities due to any "vicious habits."

He was found to be wholly disabled when it came to manual labor due to the cataracts in both of his eyes, the varicose veins in his right leg, his age and obesity.





Monday, April 13, 2020

Index Sheet

This is an Index Sheet found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  The list begins on 2 September 1890, when he originally filed for his pension under the Act of June 27, 1890, which provided a pension for any veteran of the Civil War that served for the Union Army.  He had served for a short time at the end of the war with Company I of the 215th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry.

This Index Sheet lists all of my third great-grandfather's increases and requests for increases in his Pension.  The list ends with the date of 27 November 1901, with the testimony of two of his acquaintances, William White and Willet Walton, on his behalf.


Monday, March 23, 2020

Invalid Pension Form December 28, 1891

This Invalid Pension form is from my third great-grandfather's Civil War Pension File.  At the time of the filing of this form, he was living at 1416 South 15th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  He qualified for a Civil War pension because he served as a private in Company I of the 215 Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry.  He did a short term of service at the end of the Civil War, from April 8, 1865 to July 31, 1865.

As of September 2, 1890, he was receiving $6 per month from the United States government.  That increased to $8 on December 4, 1891.  He was claiming disability from a right hernia and impaired vision.

His attorney was W.V. Sickel, whose office was at 729 Walnut Street, also in the city of Philadelphia.  Mr. Sickel's attorney fee was $10 to file this form.  Ironically, this was more than what my third-great grandfather was getting as his monthly pension.  Those $10 would equal about $284 today.



Monday, March 9, 2020

Increase Invalid Pension December 18, 1899

This Increase Invalid Pension form is from the Civil War Pension file of my paternal third great-grandfather and was submitted on December 18, 1899.  He was living at 1416 South 15th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and he was 66 years old.

His lawyer at the time of the filing of this form was James B. O'Neill, who had an office in Philadelphia.  The cost to file this form was $25, which would be about $777 today.

My third great-grandfather had enlisted in the United States Union Army at the end of the Civil war.  He served as a private in Company I of the 215 Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry.  He served from April 8, 1865 to July 31, 1865.  This short time he served during the Civil War qualified him for a pension from the government.

At the time of this filing, he had already been approved for $8 a month for an incomplete inguinal hernia and impaired vision.  He was asking for an increase in this monthly amount due to rheumatism, varicose veins, and senility.  There is also a mention of a heart problem, which was attributed to possibly being related to his rheumatism.

This request for the increase in my third great-grandfather's monthly pension was rejected in February of 1900.


Monday, March 2, 2020

Increase Invalid Pension

This Increase Invalid Pension Form is found in the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather.  At the time of the filing of this form in 1902, he was living at 1416 South 15th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  He was receiving a Civil War Pension of $12 a month from the United States Government for his total inability to earn a support by manual labor.

He was eligible for the pension because of his service as a private in Company I of the 215th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry at the end of the Civil War.  He enlisted on April 8, 1865 and was discharged on July 31, 1865.

My third great-grandfather's attorney was James B. O'Neill, who had an office on West 6th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  There was a $2 fee to file this form, which would be about $60 dollars today.

He had already been approved for an incomplete right inguinal hernia and impaired vision.  He was asking for an increase in his pension due to the new ailments of a left inguinal hernia, total loss of sight in his right eye, rheumatism, and senility.

Instead of signing his name, my third great-grandfather signed with his mark.  I know from other forms in his Civil War Pension File that this was due to his failing eyesight and shaking of his hands.

This form was filed two years before his death, when he was 68 years old.


March 16, 1904 Receipt

This receipt is from the Civil War Pension File of my paternal third great-grandfather and is for some paper hanging that my third great-gra...